Max Eastley

Max Eastley

Max Eastley’s contribution to sonic art history is undeniable. His philosophical approach towards sound-based sculpture has inspired generations of artists working within sound art and experimental music. We are delighted to welcome him back to Fort Process following a commission in the first year of the festival. This time around Max has produced an aeolian piece which is situated on the highest point of the site, augmented with amplification.

Louise Mackenzie – Tentacular Resonances

Louise Mackenzie – Tentacular Resonances

Louise Mackenzie uses sound and new media to investigate our relationship with lively materials. At Fort Process, she will explore the entanglement of resonance and form. Using DIY technology, copper, blown glass and local seawater, she has constructed a network of lively vessels that, when approached, impart signals that resonate beneath a central organ. Although not scientifically calculated, this resonance is theoretically sufficient to allow extra-cellular DNA to be taken up by micro-organisms naturally occurring in the seawater through a process known as horizontal gene transfer. The more that the peripheral vessels are stimulated, the more likely genetic information will be transferred between organisms, thus through cultural interaction, possible new life may emerge.

Towards the end of the evening, Mackenzie will take a portion of seawater back to the ocean and release it into the waves, symbolically committing to our inescapable cultural entanglement with the wider environment.

Kathy Hinde and Matthew Olden

Kathy Hinde and Matthew Olden

Luminous Birds and Twittering Machines by Kathy Hinde with software by Matthew Olden

Luminous Birds animates a flock of origami-style birds suspended overhead. Positioned in a long line, they illuminate in turn to create the illusion of animated flight, accompanied by spatialised sounds composed from distorted pianos and bells.

Humankind maintains an ongoing fascination with attempts to decipher, understand and categorise birdsong and animal communication. Twittering Machines plays with birdsong imitation, translation, message sending, encryption, interference and miscommunications.

Works commissioned and supported by Cryptic 2016 & 2017, Kidderminster Arts Festival 2015, Töne Festival 2014 and Cove Park 2017.

Adam Basanta – A Room Listening to Itself

Adam Basanta – A Room Listening to Itself

Adam Basanta is a Canadian sound artist and experimental composer, known for his sound sculptures and installation works.

In A Room Listening to Itself, sound is produced through amplification techniques which “make audible” the physical relationships between microphones, reclaimed speaker cones, and the gallery’s surrounding acoustic environment.

Julian Weaver – Outwork

Julian Weaver – Outwork

Commissioned especially for Fort Process, Outwork proposes a new defensive imaginary for Newhaven Fort; one in which it can monitor sonic events across the locale.

‘The uninspected deteriorates’, Eisenhower once wrote. At Newhaven Fort, Outwork’s provision for coastal audition supplements the nearby National Coastalwatch station; established in 1994 to brace a ‘modernised’ Coastguard. As an analog device for neritic overhearing, Outwork anticipates the sound mirrors and ground-to-air communications experiments of the early C20. Drawing on late C19 design, Outwork retrospectively equips the Fort with mid-range acoustic sensing, expanding its design for control over the near distance by vision.

Cecile Chevalier + Chris Kiefer – Listening Mirrors

Cecile Chevalier + Chris Kiefer – Listening Mirrors

Listening Mirrors is a sound art installation and instrument that promotes shared modes of musical expression for musicians and non-musicians alike. The instrument, in its construction and interaction design, investigates ways in which collective sonic expression can be made possible using Audio Augmented Reality technology (AAR) and acoustic mirrors, whilst exploring how such environments promote collaborative sonic expression.

Listening Mirrors is composed of a virtual acoustic mirror (an IOS app built with OpenFrameworks, LibPD with bone-conduction headphones) and a parabolic acoustic mirror (built from aluminum metal sheets, piano wires and 3D printed joints, and brought under tension with double bass strings, bending each piano wire and aluminum sheet to form its parabolic shape), all networked and excited by transducers that stream sound from the real and virtual sonic environments.