Rhys Chatham

Rhys Chatham

Rhys Chatham had his musical education in the world of ‘60s New York minimalism, then later found his own direction by mixing this with the raw energy of the downtown No Wave sound. In terms of scale his work has covered the extremes, from a piece for 400 massed electric guitars to solo explorations; it is the latter he will be performing at Fort Process, a piece involving phased trumpet and guitar loops called Pythagorean Dream, named after the guitar tuning it employs.

AJA

AJA

AJA is renowned for her very cathartic, ritualistic live performances that mix unsettling noise, distressed screams, hand-made electronics and found objects with industrial beats and distorted drone. This combined with a psycho-visceral, intense performance challenges the audience by breaking down barriers and pushing limits sonically and visually.

Grischa Lichtenberger

Grischa Lichtenberger

Grischa is a multidisciplinary experimental artist living in Berlin, known for his involvement in a variety of arts such as writing, graphics, installations, video and music.

Kyoka

Kyoka

Kyoka’s otherworldly electronic music drifts between abstract computer songs and frenetic, chaotic techno. Her early work used tape manipulation as the primary medium. Moving on to synthesisers and computers, her developing sound soon attracted the attention of record labels. Having eventually found a home on the renowned Raster imprint, she now sits at the forefront of experimental dance music.


Tetsuya Umeda

Tetsuya Umeda

Experimenting with objects that he sources from the space he is performing in, Tetsuya sets up a dialogue with the building, in this case the fort’s Romney Hut. He often uses gravity, extremes of temperature, light, shadow, wind, centrifugal force and falling objects to create unstable and unpredictable conditions that he then plays with.


UKAEA

UKAEA

UKAEA is a mysterious, multi-disciplinary collective of performers, who attempt to recreate a ritual framework from disparate, unconnected scraps of the past, as perceived after some kind of event horizon or year zero.

Previous rituals have been said to involve naked people dripping in paint, occult-looking headresses, a violin, a djembe, generative software, modular synths, percussion, pedal boards, peculiar visual projections, chanting, reactive lighting, etc. The music is a mix of polyrhythmic, mesmeric percussion, and feverish levels of hypnotic, mind-altering noise.

As the performance progresses, individual input becomes re-assimilated, and a group mindset emerges; then things start getting intoxicatingly weird. The physical and spacial elements envelop the audience, and an otherworldly energy starts to flow.

Photo credit: Sylwia Jarzynka